Archive for June, 2018

Planning for a downturn in Business

Strengthening your business doesn’t just involve financial management, it includes strategies to maintain and broaden your customer base, keep morale high amongst staff and improve business practices.  Chamber of Commerce figures show that three quarters of SME’s are concerned about the economy but few have plans in place to protect their business, if business takes a downturn for the worse.

Have a plan which outlines a comprehensive menu of cost savings which could be implemented in a downturn.  Adapt products to be more suited to customer’s current needs, diversify to protect from the loss of a significant customer.  These points were posed to members of the Business Exposure Group at their recent meeting.

Cash equals survival, does this need to take precedence over profit if business goes awry.  Having a contingency plan to produce short term profit, despite a drop in revenue, can make all the difference.  A decline of 10% in revenue could wipe out the entire bottom line and most companies have a relatively narrow margin for error.

So it is important to develop your forecast on optimistic, realistic and worst case scenario basis.  But, who does?  Businesses generally fail because problems are noticed too late, so thinking about vulnerabilities and opportunities early on can be a big advantage.

Identify and maintain your strengths and your best customers.  Identify your highest-margin customers and understand what you are doing right for them.  Instead of cutting costs, be ready to shift resources to retain high margin customers and continue to be creative in how you can add value for your customers without increasing costs.  Look through your costs and identify what’s inefficient, what’s nice to have, what’s there historically, and what isn’t creating value like it used to.

Be ready to take a knife to anything that isn’t adding value.

So, how recession proof is your product or service – is it a necessity or a luxury?

Quite often banks have a level of credit granted but some levels may no longer be required, which may mean you should move them to other areas.  If business is good consider increasing your line of credit and establishing new credit facilities, even if you don’t need them at present.  Perhaps look into unconventional sources of finance as a fall-back.

Look at speeding up working capital to release cash.  If sales fall can you respond so as to avoid excess stock?  Review your sales forecasts, keep an eye on your stock inventory and reduce the number of slow moving products.  Look at other sources of income such as sub- letting part of your premises.

Review and delay your expansion plans and the purchase of high ticket items.  Categorise your company’s assets into, underperforming v high performing, and strategic v non-strategic.  Try to lock prices with your suppliers to stabilise margins.

Look at buying optimistically or defensively a competitor to stop them falling into the hands of another competitor.  Monitor advertising by competitors, if they are cutting down now is your chance to do more.  It’s equally important for your business to find new markets.

In conclusion, the best time to prepare for a downturn is when the company is operating well.  Plan ahead so that if needs be you can react in a controlled fashion.

Above is a snap shot of the comments made during the discussion at the Business Exposure Group meeting.

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